Ten Things You Might Not Know The “Black Friday”

One of the most anticipated days of merchants and consumers, the “black Friday,” Black Friday, originated in America, but today is celebrated in several countries, including Brazil, Spain or Mexico

In America, the “black Friday,” follows the Thanksgiving with long lines of people waiting to open their shops early hours.

All who are waiting to enter the stores have one goal: find products with discounts that can reach 90% of original price.

Black FridayBut when did the “black Friday,” was born? Why it got its name? Know ten o’clock curiosities of one of the most famous days of the year.

1. THE TERM BLACK FRIDAY, “BLACK FRIDAY,” REFERRED TO THE CRISIS IN THE STOCK MARKET OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

Although today we associate the largest shopping day in the United States, the term “black Friday,” originally referred to very different situations. “The adjective ‘black’ was used for many centuries to portray various types of disasters,” says linguist Benjamin Zimmer.

In the United States, the first time the term was used was the September 24, 1860, when Jay Gould and James Fisk attempted to take the gold market in the Stock Exchange of New York.

When the government was forced to intervene to correct the distortion by increasing the supply of the raw material on the market, prices dropped and many investors lost fortunes.

2. SANTA CLAUS PARADES WERE AN ANCESTOR OF THE “BLACK FRIDAY”

For many Americans, the parade on Thanksgiving, organized by the department store Macy’s, it became part of the ritual of the holiday.

But the event actually was inspired by northern neighbors. Canadian trade Eaton’s launched the first Santa Claus parade on December 2, 1905.

When Santa Claus appeared at the end of the parade, it was a sign that he had started the holiday season and, in turn, purchases career.

Obviously, it is encouraging consumers to shop at Eaton’s.

Other malls, like Macy’s, inspired by the parade began to sponsor similar events in the US

Thus, in 1924, New York first saw the Macy’s parade animal Central Park Zoo totally organized by the employees of the store.

3. THE DATE ON WHICH THANKSGIVING IS CELEBRATED WAS INDIRECTLY DETERMINED BY CUSTOMERS

Since the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century, a habit begun by Abraham Lincoln, then president set the “Thanksgiving” on the last Thursday of November. But in 1939 something unusual happened: the last Thursday coincided with the 30th of November.

Traders worried about the short period of shopping left between that day and the year-end festivities sent a petition to Franklin Roosevelt for President declared the start of the celebrations a week earlier, which was authorized.

The next three years, the Thanksgiving, which was nicknamed “Franksgiving” (a mixture of Franklin with Thanksgiving, as the holiday is known in English), was celebrated on different days in different parts of the country.

Finally, in late 1941, a joint resolution of Congress fixed the problem.

Thereafter, the Thanksgiving would be celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November, thus ensuring an additional week until Christmas shopping.

4. SYNDROME FRIDAY AFTER THANKSGIVING

According to Bonnie Taylor-Blake, a researcher at the University of North Carolina, the Factory Management and Maintenance, a newsletter of the labor market, claimed the authorship of this term associated with the holiday period.

In 1951, a circular drew attention to the number of workers who were low that day.

“Syndrome Friday after Thanksgiving is a condition whose adverse effects are second only to those of the bubonic plague. At least that is felt by those who have to work when the ‘black Friday’ comes. The store or establishment could be half empty and those who were absent for health was low, “wrote the newsletter.

The term “black Friday,” first gained popularity in Philadelphia. Police frustrated by traffic caused by consumers at that time began to call it that.

A traders obviously do not like being associated with traffic and pollution. So they decided to rename the day “Big Friday,” according to a local newspaper in 1961. It is clear that the invention is not stuck.

6. OVER TIME, THE BLACK FRIDAY CAME TO MEAN “BACK TO BLACK”

According to official data, US consumers spent US $ 59,000 million the “black Friday,” last year .. Photo: BBC
Traders managed in this way give a positive interpretation to the term, referring to the moment when the establishments have returned to the black, that is, to make profits.

There is no evidence that that was indeed so, if it is true that the holiday period is the part of the year when there is more consumption.

Last year, it is estimated that consumers spent more than US $ 59,000 million “black Friday,” according to the national association of US trade.

But how many of those revenues become really benefit is unclear, given that traders often work with more limited margins because they offer big discounts.

7. THE BLACK FRIDAY DID NOT BECAME A NATIONAL REFERENCE TO THE 90S

The term “black Friday,” remained limited to Philadelphia for a surprisingly long time.

“You could see it used in moderation in Trenton, New Jersey, but not beyond the borders of Philadelphia until age 80,” says linguist Zimmer.

“The term only expanded from mid-90s”.

8. THE “BLACK FRIDAY” BECAME THE BIGGEST SHOPPING DAY OF THE YEAR IN 2001

Although the black Friday is considered the biggest shopping day of the year, date not won that reputation until the 2000s.

That’s because, for many years, the rule was not that Americans worship rebates but worshiped postponed.

So, until then, it was Saturday and not Friday the day’s portfolios remained empty.

9. THE “BLACK FRIDAY,” HE WON THE WORLD

For too long, Canadian merchants were dying of envy of their American counterparts, especially when their loyal customers put foot on the ground to travel south in search of good deals.

But now they began to offer their own settlements, although the Thanksgiving is celebrated in Canada a month earlier.

In Mexico, the “black Friday,” received a new name: the “successful outcome”.

The commemoration is associated with the anniversary of the 1910 revolution in Mexico, which sometimes coincides with the Thanksgiving in the United States (the revolution began on November 20, 1910). As the name suggests, the event lasts all weekend.

In Brazil, where the Thanksgiving holiday there, the “black Friday,” went on to be included in the business calendar of the country when traders realized the sales potential of the day.

10. IS THE “BLACK FRIDAY,” ENDANGERED?

Wal-Mart, the largest retail chain in the world, broke the tradition of “black Friday,” in 2011, when it opened its facilities to clients on the night of Thanksgiving holiday.

Since then, dealers across the country threw the eye to millions of Americans eager to fill shopping after eating turkey.

But do not worry, traders and baptize invented a name for that extra day of shopping, “Gray Thursday”.

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